Announcing the Best in Silicon Valley Tech for 2017

Tech in Motion names top local companies in tech in front of hundreds of the Silicon Valley community

Silicon Valley (September 29, 2017) Tech in Motion Silicon Valley declared the winners for its 2nd Annual Timmy Awards, which recognizes the top workplaces for tech professionals. Winners were first unveiled live during a ceremony at SAP last week, hosted by Chief Operating Officer of SAP Labs US, Scott Leatherman. The local community and a panel of expert judges chose winners from an initial field of over 100 nominees in four award categories, Best Tech Startup, Manager, Work Culture and Workplace for Diversity.

Winners for Tech in Motion Silicon Valley’s 2017 Timmy Awards include:

  • Best Tech Work Culture: Cisco
    • Runner-up: Mojio
  • Best Tech Startup: NIO U.S.
    • Runner-up: Knightscope
  • Best Tech Workplace for Diversity: SAP
    • Runner-up: Branch
  • Best Tech Manager: Henry Chen, Director of Infrastructure, Drawbridge
    • Runner-up: Darren Chinen, Senior Director of Data Science & Engineering, Malwarebytes

This year’s Timmy Awards differed from past by incorporating a panel of expert judges including Katie Roof, Tech Reporter at TechCrunch, Tanya Soman, Venture Partner at 500 Startups, and Jennifer Elias, Tech Reporter at the Silicon Valley Business Journal. Tech in Motion also recognized companies in a new award category this year, Best Tech Workplace for Diversity.

“Diversity is not only a trending topic in tech but across all industries,” said Mandy Walker, Director of Marketing at Tech in Motion and Motion Recruitment Partners. “Adding the Workplace for Diversity award recognizes and celebrates the companies who know that diversity isn’t just a trending term or requirement but a key ingredient to the creativity and success of a company.”

A complete list of 2017 Silicon Valley winners for the Timmys can be found here for all four award categories, highlighting tech work culture, workplace diversity and management as well as startups. Previous winners have included innovators such as LearnVest, Venmo, Trip Advisor and many more. For details on the event, past winners, or the Timmy Awards in all 10 cities they take place in, click here.

About Tech in Motion Events & The Timmy Awards

Tech in Motion is a North American events series that brings local tech community professionals together to connect, learn, and innovate. What started as a collaborative project between IT recruiting firms Jobspring Partners and Workbridge Associates in 2011, grew into an organization of over 90,000 members across 11 chapters in North America including Boston, Dallas, New York, Philadelphia, DC, Chicago, San Francisco, Silicon Valley, LA, Orange County and Toronto. Please visit www.techinmotionevents.com for more information about our notable speakers, sponsors and events.

Award-Winning Secrets to Success from Previous Best Manager Recipients

For the past few years, Tech in Motion Events has encouraged local tech communities to nominate top tech managers from all over North America and celebrated those leaders at the annual Timmy Awards. Thus far, 16 have claimed the trophy as their region’s Best Tech Manager with another 11 looking to hoist the hardware later this year. From bridging the gap between employee and employer to keeping energy levels high, the secrets that these managers shared aren’t just the keys to their success, but also to keeping their teams engaged, eager to constantly improve, and excited to come into work every single day.

Do you have a manager like this? Nominate him or her as a 2017 Timmy Award Best Tech Manager.

Strong management in the workplace impacts every employee within the company. For instance, in a 2015 survey on Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement from The Society for Human Resource Management, 55% of employees surveyed rated the trust between employees and senior management as “very important,” the fifth-highest rated of any aspect considered. For Andrew Santorelli, Senior Development Manager at KANETIX SaaS in Toronto, giving feedback is one thing he has always valued, even from his days as a junior employee. “I always felt like I was doing a good job, but I never knew my manager saw the same thing. It’s hard to know where to put your energy or how to meet expectations when you are not given any feedback.” With the goal of providing more transparency and thus, more trust, Santorelli has implemented various checkpoints throughout the year specifically for giving employees feedback: how they’re doing in the workplace, what areas they’re excelling in, and where they need to improve.

CTA2Of course, there needs to be a balance between work and play. In the survey mentioned above, 53% of employees also rated work/life balance as “very important” to their job satisfaction. However, it’s not just change that has to come from the top: “they always make fun of me because I want to play games or take them to the park,” reflects Eva Pagneux, Product Manager of Hexo+ by Squadrone Systems, based out of San Francisco. She knows that her energy keeps her team motivated even if they do poke fun at her for it.

One of the most important points stressed by multiple managers was finding a style of management that works not just for you, but for the team as well. “Leadership is about responsibility, not authority” says Seth Dobbs, VP of Engineering at HS2 Solutions. Coming from a previous role that included a servant-master relationship with a previous manager, Seth adopted a style of giving responsibility to his employees, so he could lead as a mentor rather than a boss. Empowering rather than directing your employees will help them develop in the long-run.

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And finally, for the advice they’d give all other managers? It’s simple: Venkat Rangasamy, Principal Software Architect at Equinix in San Jose, sums it up best when he says his managing style follows the mantra Do stuff, no bluff.” He suggests to be transparent and a part of the team rather than managing and directing from behind a closed office door. Understand your team members and their concerns, and focus on making others successful, because ultimately, their successes are your successes.

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Ultimately, 2017 will allow 10 regions to crown a new “Best Tech Manager,” one that promotes career growth, ensures a great team culture, inspires innovation, and has a clear and communicated vision to produce a great product. The managers quoted above have embodied what it means to be a great manager by leading their teams to success through their many projects and initiatives and continue to do so year-after-year. To learn more about what it takes to become a Timmy Award-winning manager or to nominate a certain special manager in your life, visit the Timmy Awards’ website here.

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Third Annual Timmy Awards Now Accepting Nominations for 2017’s Best in Tech

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Tech in Motion invites the tech community to choose the top IT employers in North America

(July 11, 2017) – Tech in Motion, one of North America’s largest tech event series, is pleased to announce that nominations are now open for the 2017 Timmy Awards. The Timmys recognize companies and managers that create the best places for technology professionals to work in 10 major cities, with past finalists such as Jet, Venmo, Facebook and Pandora. The awards program will accept submissions here today through August 14.

“While there are dozens of award ceremonies recognizing companies for technological advancements, the Timmy Awards aim to celebrate the employers and managers that make this growth possible,” says Mandy Walker, Director of Marketing at Tech in Motion and Motion Recruitment Partners. “Since the Timmy Awards were created in 2015, over 400 finalists have been celebrated for creating work environments that enable innovation in the technology spheres of various industries.”

For companies or managers in the communities of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, DC, Chicago, San Francisco, Silicon Valley, LA, Orange County & San Diego and Toronto, the public can submit nominations for any of the four Timmy Award categories this year:

On August 21, Tech in Motion will announce the Timmy Award finalists for each region and kick off the voting period, which will officially be open to the public until September 8.  Winners will be selected through a combination of votes from the tech community and a panel of local judges. For a comprehensive description of the awards, nomination and voting process, please check out the Timmy Awards here.

Award winners will be announced at a live ceremony in each city during the month of September, with presentations from leaders in the tech community. The Timmy Awards Ceremony is a free event open to the public. To find out additional event details on the Timmy Awards nearest you, visit techinmotionevents.com.

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About Tech in Motion Events

Tech in Motion is an international events series that brings local tech community professionals together to connect, learn, and innovate. What started as a collaborative project between IT recruiting firms  Jobspring Partners and Workbridge Associates in 2011, grew into an organization of over 85,000 members across 11 chapters in North America including Boston, Dallas, New York, Philadelphia, DC, Chicago, San Francisco, Silicon Valley, LA, Orange County and Toronto. Please visit www.techinmotionevents.com for more information about our notable speakers, sponsors and events.

Media Contact:
Lindsay Lewis
[email protected]
469.458.9486

The 2017 Timmy Awards: What to Expect

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Two years ago, Tech in Motion set out to recognize (and celebrate) the best employers for tech professionals in North America through the Timmy Awards. In 2016 alone, the Timmy’s saw more than 2,000 companies nominated and over 83,000 votes cast to name each city’s “Best Technology Manager,” “Best Tech Startup,” and “Best Tech Work Culture.” The Timmy Awards has featured national household names such as Dollar Shave Club, TripAdvisor, Instacart, and Venmo, as well as dozens of local heroes that make each community successful. In pursuit of the same level of success, this year, Tech in Motion is making a few changes to improve the entire award series from the nomination process all the way through to event night. To learn what these changes are, check out the 2017 Timmy Awards FAQ below!

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2017 TIMMY AWARDS FAQ
When will the 2017 Timmy Awards take place?

In the past, the Timmy Awards were spread throughout the year in 10 different regions. This year, the award ceremonies will all take place in the month of September, bringing together our cities in a unified effort to showcase the best employers for technical employees. Every one of the 10 cities will hold a Timmy Award ceremony within a few weeks of each other.

Who can attend? The Timmy Awards is still a free event that is open to the public, not only to attend, but also to submit nominations for. This award series is an amazing opportunity to gain exposure for any companies or individuals in the tech community, and in order to keep it in the local community, we want anyone who is invested in the future of tech in your city to attend, including tech professionals, managers, entrepreneurs, and founders.

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Which awards are presented?

Tech in Motion began with three award categories: Best Tech Manager, Best Tech Startup, and Best Tech Work Culture. This year, Tech in Motion decided to add an additional award category: the Best Tech Workplace for Diversity award. The goal of the original Timmy Awards categories was to recognize companies not just for their use or development of technology, but also for their investment in the people that make technology possible, which the new award category rewards.

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Below are the criteria by which each of the Timmy Awards winners are selected in each category:

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How will the nomination process run in 2017?

Nominations will be open from July 5th to August 14th for 10 regions (Toronto, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, DC, Chicago, Orange County, LA, Silicon Valley, and San Francisco). Nominations will be open to the public to nominate a company or person that creates the best work environment for technology professionals to work in 1 or all 4 award categories. Additionally, as previous years, nominations will continue to be a two-part process. To be eligible as a finalist for any category, it is required to fill out and complete Part 1 and 2 of the nomination forms. However, we are now automating this process, which means that once you complete Part 1 of the nomination form and are eligible to become a nominee, you should receive an automated email within 24 hours prompting you to complete Part 2.

If you’re interested in getting involved in the 2017 Timmy Awards, as a sponsor, MC, venue host, etc., please contact your local Tech in Motion chapter.

Read about the 2016 Timmy Awards held in various regions by clicking the links below:

How to Earn $200K+ as a Software Engineer

Over the last two years, Tech in Motion’s proud supporters, Jobspring Partners and Workbridge Associates, have worked with hundreds of thousands of engineers across the United States and Canada to find these tech professionals exciting positions. While the vast majority end up in positions that pay between $50,000 and $140,000, these agencies have also placed many engineers at the $200K-$300K+ range.

Many candidates wonder: “What qualifies an engineer for a $200K+ salary? And how can I get there?” Given the 27 years of experience that Jobspring and Workbridge have working within the technology industry, it is clear that there are some key factors that you should keep in mind before you go shooting for the stars. Here are the top four determinants that can help you map out your career as well as help you dream and achieve bigger:

Want to earn $200K working as a Software Engineer or check out other tech opportunities? Click here to view our Tech Job Board!

1. Location, Location, Location

You can be the greatest developer with a Ph.D. in Engineering, but a $200K position may not exist in the geographic region you live in. Are you willing to relocate? Most of the job openings in the $200K range that Jobspring and Workbridge often deal with are located in San Francisco, San Jose, New York, Washington DC, Chicago, and Los Angeles. If you’re not open to relocating to a place where the pay is higher, you may be limiting yourself.

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*Based on Jobspring and Workbridge Placements.

Check out what tech jobs are available in these US locations – click here!

 

2. Experience

Experience plays a critical role when it comes to salary negotiation. Over the last four years, there was only one person that these agencies placed at a just-under-$200K salary who had only two years of experience. (This person had some exceptional accomplishments and specialized in Front-End Development.) Most companies want to see at least seven years of experience before they even consider higher six-figure salaries. In fact, the majority of the agencies’ $200K placements were with candidates that had 11-28 years of experience.

 

3. Technology and Skills

Technology and skills are critical components to gaining a higher salary. Do you have the right skills? Do you need to learn a new programming language or move to a different field or niche? Your skills, and how you can sell yourself, are essential parts of getting the highest salary possible. Based on all of the placements done by Jobspring and Workbridge from 2013-2016, Java Developers were the leaders of the $200K club. Mobile, Network Security, Front End, Ruby on Rails, Product Management, and UI/UX were all among the top technologies when it came to highest salaries.

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*Comparing Jobspring and Workbridge salaries by technology and experience with the average for Software Engineers.

 

4. Seniority and Leadership

The majority of people placed with a $200K+ salary are generally at a Senior Management or C-Level position working for a startup or Fortune 500 company. Often times, these people are placed with companies who were looking to hire “on the street” to fill their VP or C-Level positions. So if you think that a Ph.D. in Engineering and decades of experience will eventually guarantee you a big promotion to a Senior Executive level, think again. A lot of employers feel comfortable hiring experienced engineers working for other companies and don’t see the need to promote within the company.

As an engineer, you must prove that you are not only a talented coder, but also an effective manager who can lead others, take ownership, and make critical decisions. At the Senior Executive level, you need to demonstrate leadership acumen. An MBA (full-time, executive, online, or part-time) with a Master’s Degree in Engineering and a focus on Management, as well as courses and a certificate on Leadership, are all important aspects of becoming a candidate who can qualify for a higher six-figure compensation.

 

Start Your Future Today

Map out what experiences, technologies, stretch assignments, and leadership abilities you need to embody as you journey toward higher paying positions. An investment in yourself now is an investment in your future. Begin today and set yourself upon a course to earning your full potential.

Let us help you find your dream job! Contact a Jobspring Partners or Workbridge Associates in your city to kickstart the process.

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Product Design Trends: The Future

Within the tech industry, it is becoming increasingly important to broaden our skills and embrace new ones that are paving the way of our future. Product design is described as a whole process with many different factors that go into the design. From concept to completion, an idea evolves through a life cycle of UX/UI designers, graphic/visual designers, user researchers, data analysts, and prototypers to name a few. As we see day to day, current trends of messaging, virtual reality, all things “smart”, and data storage are consistently changing.

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Tech in Motion: Silicon Valley recently held a Product Design Demo at The California Art Institute in Sunnyvale. With roughly 200 tech enthusiasts in attendance for the night, the event showcased companies such as:

  • Zackees– the World’s first turn signal glove
  • FlameStower– designs/manufactures energy products and services for global markets
  • PocketLab– a wireless multi-sensor and software platform that enables anyone to engage in open ended science experiments
  • VivaLnk– developing integrated solutions with its ultra-thin and flexible eSkin™ wearable technology platform
  • Nixie– the first wearable camera that is also flyable
  • The Wearhaus Arc– Bluetooth headphones that let you wirelessly sync music with multiple people around you
  • Orion– creates communication accessories and services that connect people
  • Ministry of Supply– research-based design used to create purposeful products for a life spent in motion
  • Flashtag Photo– an interactive photo booth that automatically prints photos taken at your event when they’re tagged on Instagram or Twitter.

Sign up to attend the next drinks & demos event from Tech in Motion by finding the closest one here.

Throughout the night,Tech in Motion organizers interviewed the guests and demo companies on what some of their favorite products are, what the future holds for product design, and the hottest design trends on the market now. Here are some of their responses:

What are some of the trends in product design for 2015?

Richie Zeng, CEO/Founder of Wearhaus  

“I’m seeing a lot of connected devices and products built around connectivity with phones as the central hub.”

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Sylvia Wu, Design Lead at Orion

“Wearables that add value to people’s lives, or products that are specific for communication. Products utilizing voices are becoming popular as well because you can convey emotions through tone, for example Siri and Amazon Echo.”

Clifton Zoozeboom, CEO/Co-founder of PocketLab

“Simplicity. Everyone is following the ‘Apple Way’.”

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What makes your product stand out among competitors?

Alena Laptsinskaya, Director of Customer Relations for Zackees

“We make better quality products. We have sensors that detect ambient light so that the LED will be brighter at night. We have a feature that disconnects the light after a certain amount of time to save battery, and you can change out batteries, unlike our competitors.”

What was the story behind your product and what does the future look like for it?

Adam Kell, Founder at FlameStower

“We’re aiming to impact energy services, and we’re also currently partnering up with the Guatemalan Government as well as doing some work in Ethiopia.”

“In 3 months we will start working on emergency energy solutions. Like for earthquake kits.”

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What is your current product you are involved with and how does it play a role in consumer’s lives?

Guy Horgan, Sales consultant for Ministry of Supply

“We do ‘smart’ men’s clothing… We are looking into eyewear as well.”

“We want our customers to feel comfortable in our clothes all day. We want work life integration. Our customers can go from work, to dinner, to a movie, and then out for drinks without the need to change or any discomfort.”

Interested in participating in a Tech in Motion event? Contact your city’s team here.

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Audience favorites of the evening were Nixie, PocketLab, and VivaLnk to name a few. Be sure to keep an eye out for these companies and how they will be impacting the product world and possibly our very own lives.

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There’s an exciting lineup of events coming up for Tech in Motion in Silicon Valley this spring and summer. Join in on the next meetup by becoming a group member and see what’s on the docket for April and May.

12 Great Pieces Of Advice From Female Software Engineers

Here are the top 12 golden pieces of forward-thinking, action-oriented advice from female software engineers that have been shared on the Hackbright Academy blog this year:

#1 – How To Detect Female-Friendliness In A Company / Engineering Team

Thumbtack software engineer and Hackbright alumna Katie Thomas suggests 5 questions to ask an interviewer to detect how female-friendly a company or engineering team is. Asking “how do people ask questions” or “Are any engineers involved in programs aimed at supporting women in the industry? (e.g. PyLadies, Women Who Code, Hackbright, etc.)” will help you figure out if this workplace is right for you.

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#2 – How To Not Suffer From Imposter Syndrome

Hackbright alumna and software engineer Gulnara Mirzakarimova shares 5 lessons on beating imposter syndrome. Our favorite is #5 – “Accept the fact that there are things that you do not know, there are things that you will never know and there are things that You Can Decide To Learn.”

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#3 – Focus

Flixster software engineer and Hackbright alumna Aimee Morgan blogged about focus. She shares that “being a beginner at something in your mid-thirties is alternately terrifying / humbling / awesome.” Agreed.

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#4 – Self Care Strategies For The Job Search

Hackbright software engineer and alumna Meggie Mahnken shares self care strategies for the software engineer job search. She crowdsourced advice from Hackbright alumnae, from not letting an interview outfit go to waste (go out with friends to dinner after an interview!) to “set a mini-goal for yourself to have something more achievable and within your control as a measure of success, rather than just ‘did you get an offer or not’ from the interview.”

Find your next role on the Tech in Motion job board here.

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#5 – Learn Git and GitHub

Self-taught web developer Jenn Wong shares her story about learning to code and working at Zillow. Her advice? “Learn Git and use GitHub to keep a record of the work you’re doing.” Now she’s working on becoming a full-stack engineer.

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#6 – Read It Three Times If You Have To

Self-taught engineer and Spitfire entrepreneur Erin Parker shares her story of learning to code: “I started going through the Michael Hartl Ruby on Rails tutorial and I ended up going through it 3x before things really started to click. In tech, you learn that you can teach yourself anything by googling stuff, finding a book, reading documentation.”

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#7 – Have Confidence But More Importantly, Perseverance

Skybox Imaging software engineer and Hackbright alumna Danielle Levi shares advice about perseverance and confidence: “It’s easy to compare yourself to others in the industry and find yourself lacking. However, its often not a fair comparison. In my case, I found my interest in technology and computer science at a later point in life. I’ve had less time to learn as much. Everyone has their own unique obstacles. It’s better to compare yourself to yourself. Think about your progress, how much you’ve accomplished, and exercise self-compassion. Stay passionate and keep learning.”

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#8 – Find Your Local Programming Resources and Meetups

Rachel Ann Werner went to Nashville Software School and learned to program – she’s now a back-end developer at iostudio. She recommends “getting out there and meeting people at programming user groups.” Rachel also founded the Nashville chapter of Girl Geek Dinners, an organization that encourages young women into technology careers. And on Meetup.com, she met the ladies of Nashville Women Programmers (pictured, below).

Find a local Tech in Motion event happening near your city.

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#9 – Ask For Help

Uber software engineer and Hackbright mentor Martha Girdler shared advice on “politely and unobtrusively asking for help”. She advises mentees to “don’t be afraid to politely and unobtrusively email someone you admire in your field and ask for mentorship. It’s best to ask for a small amount of their time (a phone call once every few months, a few emails here and there). Always take notes, and research your potential mentor thoughtfully and thoroughly. If they say yes, your first priority is to ask thoughtful questions!”

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#10 – It’s OK To Not Know Everything

Medium software engineer Jean Hsu assures new programmers: “it’s OK not to know everything.” She continues that “it’s impossible to know everything, but sometimes, especially at the beginning, it’s easy to think that everyone else knows it all. There’s plenty of time to learn. You are not an imposter. It is incredibly unlikely that you got lucky over and over and over again. It’s much much more likely that you got where you are through hard work and your accomplishments.”

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#11 – Remember, This Too Shall Pass

Presidential Innovation Fellow and software engineer Sarah Allen was a young mom when someone told her “this too shall pass”. Sarah reminds us that “when things really suck, remember that this too shall pass, and when things are really great, remember that this too shall pass.”

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#12 – Do The Hardest Thing

Femgineer founder and software engineer Poornima Vijayashanker urges women to “do the hardest thing”. Instead of doing what’s easiest – that will bring her the maximum benefit – Poornima always chose to pursue the hard path. She’s programmed herself to do the hardest things in life, but they’ve also brought her the greatest joy.

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By Angie Chang (VP Strategic Partnerships, Hackbright Academy – shown left)

Tech in Motion: Silicon Valley is recognizing Women’s History Month with a Women of Influence panel event. These women are taking the lead head on in the technology industry. Through courage, compassion, and conviction they have built their way up to represent the top in their class. Please join Tech in Motion: Silicon Valley for this educational and inspiring panel discussion on March 26, 2015 at Microsoft (Bldg 1) located at 1065 La Avenida Street, Mountain View, CA. RSVP here.

“Kickstart” into 2015

When someone hears the word “Kickstart” it automatically sparks an interest and excitement. “Kickstart” embodies a vision, innovation, a dream, and the possibility of the next big thing in an industry.

High_Res_Logo_no_shield_Sm_400x400Tech in Motion: Silicon Valley wanted to start the New Year off with a bang and welcome 2015 with a “Kickstart” into the New Year Mixer held at Strike Brewery Co. in downtown San Jose.

This networking event was aimed with a goal to connect people and ideas together. Building off of one another made the theme of the night very inspiring whether you were new to the tech industry or a seasoned veteran. Conversations throughout the crowd, were of passionate tech enthusiasts who had their eye on what the future could possibly hold.

Interested in hosting or sponsoring a Tech in Motion event? Contact us here

The taproom for Strike was actually funded through Kickstarter making it the perfect venue to host this event. Located in an industrial environment with an open floor plan design, it was the ideal space to display their huge steel tanks for brewing. The mixer was packed with over 100 techies in attendance, ranging from Kickstart companies to founders in search of co-founders, and regular tech lovers interested in new products/designs.

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The night was filled with plenty of perks for the early attendees including: free drink tickets, free group tours of the brewing facility, delicious food from Melts my Heart Truck, and a special promotion for members to come back between January 8th– February 28th to enjoy a “Buy one four-flight, get the second for a penny!”

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Strike recently just released their new winter seasonal Stout. A crowd favorite for the event, it is definitely something to stop by and enjoy while relaxing and playing some games or watching your favorite sports team.

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Keep the momentum going in Silicon Valley with Tech in Motion’s events coming up in spring: The Women of Influence Tech Talk on March 26th, the Social Tech Mixer on April 9th and more.

Not in Silicon Valley? Check out our list of events happening across the nation.

The Future of Virtual Reality

1097723620Written by Arthur van Hoff, CTO at Jaunt

Virtual reality is something many people have heard of, but few have experienced. Yet trying to put it into words is, as one blogger stated, “like trying to take a picture of your favorite song.” Poised to disrupt the way we see, live and engage with the world, the fully immersing experience of VR has the potential to change the face not just of gaming or entertainment, but has implications for education, travel, healthcare, real estate, and more.

Today, you can put on VR goggles and have an immersive experience beyond your imagination – with high-definition 360-degree, 3D video and binaural audio, you can feel as though you’re in the world’s most spectacular places, on stage next to your favorite musician, or on the field cheering on your home team, even when you’re thousands of miles away.

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The truly exciting part about virtual reality is that this is just the beginning. The potential applications for this technology is something that excites us tremendously and we are continuously exploring.

Much of the content that is currently being developed for virtual reality goggles is simulated or digitally produced, along the lines of video games. At Jaunt, we’re building the full-stack technology to create cinematic VR. This includes the camera, software editing, and content production. Instead of exploring a simulated world, you can be transported to other places in the real world.

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This also means exploring new means of storytelling beyond the current capabilities of traditional film-making. We’re discovering new ways to use the technology, and it’s opening up huge new doors for writers, directors, actors, artists, and other content creators.

We shared some of what we’ve discovered and created at the Tech In Motion event this week. We enjoyed sharing the experience of cinematic VR with you and you’ll see some action photos in an event recap posted later in the month.

Tech in Motion Silicon Valley is also proud to announce their September event, Security & Technology: BYOD, Home, & Mobile {Sponsored By Microsoft & Appvance}. You can RSVP here.

arthurAbout the author: Arthur van Hoff is serial entrepreneur and was most recently CTO at Flipboard. He started his career in Silicon Valley at Sun Microsystems where he was an early developer of the Java programming language. Since then he has started several successful companies. Arthur has expertise in machine learning, big data, mobile applications, 3D printing, and computational photography. He is originally from the Netherlands and has a master’s degree in Computer Science from Strathclyde University in Glasgow.

8 Great Pieces Of Startup Advice From 4 Silicon Valley Stars Under 30

Twentysomethings have it pretty good in Silicon Valley. To the extent that age discrimination exists, it generally favors the young. It may be the one place in America where a 23-year-old can introduce himself as a CEO and no one bats an eye.

But being a young business leader in the technology industry comes with its share of challenges. Whatever you’re doing — hiring people, raising funding, negotiating compensation — chances are you’re doing it for the first time. Everyone expects you to act like a hyper-entitled Millennial brat. Many of your peers are hyper-entitled Millennial brats, and you have to work with them.

For the past three years, FORBES has been identifying young innovators and game-changers in the tech world as part of our annual 30 Under 30 list.  A few days ago, Tech In Motion Silicon Valley gathered four of our honorees at Microsoft’s offices in Mountain View for a conversation about what it’s like to run a fast-growing tech company while still in one’s twenties.

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The participants were: Steven Eidelman, cofounder of Whistle; Lisa Falzone, CEO and cofounder of Revel Systems; AJ Forsythe, CEO and cofounder of iCracked; and Morgan Knutson, chief product designer at Dropbox. The discussion was wide-ranging and full of hard-won lessons. Here are eight of them:

1. Accept that even your dream job is going to suck sometimes. “I used to be a competitive swimmer,” said Falzone. “I think all good things in life are love/hate for me.”

It may seem obvious that sacrifice comes before achievement, but members of Gen Y grew up hearing the message that work should offer personal fulfillment, Forsythe said. “I think that can get lost in translation as probably not ‘You’re going to work harder than you’ve ever done and it’s going to be s****y work, and the happiness is going to be delayed,’” he said.  “It’s not that you shouldn’t optimize for happiness, but you have to do stuff you don’t want to do.”

2. Hiring good people is too important too rush. “The best people in the world at hiring still only get it about 70 to 80% right,” Forsythe said. “I always find it’s best to wait for the right hire,” agreed Falzone, adding that she once took nine months to hire a head of HR — and would probably have had to fire the candidates she almost hired for the job.

3. Talent isn’t the place to get cheap. For all the talk of fulfillment, “businesses exist to make money,” said Knutson. “They don’t exist for any other reason than to make money. We can misconstrue it as altruism as much as we want, but the fact is we spend our life on wages.” The people you want to hire understand that and aren’t going to accept less than they’re worth. “For me, if this person is amazing, I never want to lose them, and I’m going to pay this person whatever they need,” he said.

Tech in Motion: Silicon Valley

4. That said, just throwing money around can get you the wrong sort of talent. “If someone comes in and there’s already a sense of entitlement because they were making way too much money in the their last job, that’s going to be an issue,” said Eidelman.

“This is advice for everyone: If the first thing out of their mouth in an interview is about compensation, kick their ass out the door,” agreed Knutson.

6. Startups are great places to get experience, but lousy places to get formal training.  Because so many of them are launched by people just out of college, graduates think of startups as good first jobs, but that’s not necessarily the case. “Early stage companies just don’t have the time or the manpower to train people,” said Falzone. “If you just want to pick it up and learn it on your own, then join an early stage company.” If you need a more structured form of experience, big companies are the way to go.

7. Networking is best when it doesn’t feel like networking. “Don’t pitch right away” is Eidelman’s advice to founders looking for backers. He and his cofounder spent two years in private equity before becoming “obsessed” with the idea for Whistle, at which point they were able to go back to people they’d known in their previous lives for help. “A lot of those relationships we leaned on for our first round of funding were people we met right out of college,” he said. “Relationships matter.”

8. Use the power of narrative. Forsythe, whose company repairs shattered screens on smart phones and mobile devices, said he wrote “Tell stories and explain why” on a whiteboard in his office. It’s a message that he uses as a sort of mantra to help him stay motivated and motivate those around him. “It’s always important that you can go back to why you’re doing what you’re doing, and the way you do that is by telling stories,” he said.

Read the original blog post here on Forbes.com by Jeff Bercovici – and don’t forget to RSVP for Sweet Summer Mixer at Tech in Motion Silicon Valley on July 16th.

Interested in more insights from young innovators? Check out the first-ever FORBES Under 30 Summit in Philadelphia this October.